Self-Experiment with applied Source Code Meditation to improve athletic readiness to perform

Intention

With this experiment, I would like to measure and explore the health benefits of Source Code Meditation. This will be an intellectual observation of the changes occurring within my cardiovascular health.

Introduction

Years of research have shown that heightened cardiovascular reactivity and delayed recovery to acute stressors are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk (Steptoe and Marmot, 2005). Decades of research has linked high job strain to anxiety and depression, increased blood pressure (BP), cardiovascular events, and metabolic syndrome (Chandola et al., 2006).

There are numerous plausible biological pathways linking stress to cardiovascular disease, with most of the current evidence pointing to stress-related changes in the immune, autonomic, and neuroendocrine systems. I will be using this experiment to attempt to show heart health benefits made possible by salutogenesis. Salutogenesis, the origin of health, is a stress resource orientated concept, which focuses on resources, maintains and improves the movement towards health(1). It gives the answer why people despite stressful situations and hardships stay well. The theory can be applied at an individual, a group, and a societal level. It is the opposite of the pathogenic concept where the focus is on the obstacles and deficits. According to Antonovsky, health was seen as a movement in a continuum on an axis between total ill health (dis-ease) and total health (ease)[2]. The ability to comprehend the whole situation and the capacity to use the resources available was called sense of coherence (SOC). This capacity was a combination of peoples’ ability to assess and understand the situation they were in, to find a meaning to move in a health promoting direction, also having the capacity to do so—that is, comprehensibility, meaningfulness, and the manageability, to use Antonovsky’s own terms(1). The brain networks that control stress-induced changes in these peripheral systems have also been identified, and can be described as the systems related to threat processing, safety processing, and social cognition (2). This is exactly why Source Code Meditation is essential to leading humanity in the next step of physiological evolutionary processes.

In this experiment, stressful events(High Intensity Interval Training) caused stress responses that involve activation of physiologic systems. In the short term, mobilizing physiological salutogenesis to respond to a discrete event or threat is adaptive. In the long term, however, Source Code Meditation will help humanity to become infrangible.

The “wear and tear” hypothesis is theoretically compelling, but currently lacks definitive empirical support. This is because we do not currently have data that demonstrates how Source Code Meditation uses multiple physiological systems to help humans with evolving and transcending their own realities. Other potential pathways could include stress-related changes in endothelial function, elevated chronic inflammation, metabolic dysfunction, changes in DNA repair, changes in gene expression, and telomere shortening. These are all exciting areas of research, some of which fit in to the “wear and tear” hypothesis  and others that suggest alternate processes. These pathways are relevant for numerous chronic diseases beyond cardiovascular disease.

Because of this common thread, chronic systemic inflammation has become a recent focus of health research. Stress exposure has been examined extensively as a predictor of increased systemic inflammation. Indeed, elevated systemic inflammation has been found in those experiencing chronic stress like caregivers, immediately after a stressful life event like death of a loved one, historical stress like childhood adversity, daily stress, and in response to lab-based stress tasks. A short-term inflammatory response to stress is thought to be adaptive because it involves recruiting immune cells to the site of a real or potential injury in order to heal wounds resulting from stressor exposure(3). However, when there is no wound to heal, as is the case with psychosocial stressor exposure, repeated or exaggerated inflammatory responses may cause long-term damage and contribute to disease processes. Salutogenesis may be the perfect physiological combatant to chronic stress and inflammation. I would love to continue to experiment with Source Code Meditational research to explore this idea over time.

Hypothesis:

In the trials where the Source Code Meditation method of breathing is utilized, I will see huge benefits in HRV score. General heart rate will decrease immensely faster in trials where the meditation was utilized to recover from the high intensity exercise.

Materials

  • Polar Pulse Chest-strapped heart rate monitor
  • a free app named “Elite HRV” to record Heart Data
  • a space to workout
  • jump rope
  • two dumbbells with moderate to lightweight
  • weighted vest or book bag

Procedure and Variables

I will measure and compare my heart rate and heart rate variability using a Polar Pulse Chest strap to record a snapshot reading before exercise. Then I will record an open reading of heart data after performing High Intensity Interval Training. Each training session will be an hour long. During the live reading of heart data, I will be generally measuring and looking for how long it takes to bring my heart rate down to a level close to the initial reading of heart rate before exercise. Each day will be followed by specific procedures set by that day, so check back in to procedures regularly.

I will be mindful of the Heart rate variability score to show athletic readiness to perform varies throughout the recovery period after. With this said, I will have a control experiment where I don’t use aspects of the SCM meditation, and an experimental part where I do use SCM techniques to assist in heart readiness. I will be measuring and performing in a fasted state to ensure that less variables affect my overall results.

I will also perform my trials on different days to ensure that heart data is not skewed. I have been working out with High Intensity Interval Training regularly, so this experiment should be considered for correlation in other athletes as well.

Take an Open Snapshot Reading using the free app listed in materials while wearing the heart rate monitor:
  1. In this part, first ensure that strap is connected to the Elite HRV app using Bluetooth.
  2. Take a minute long snapshot average of your heart rate data- heart rate variability, average heart rate for the minute.
  3. Then, perform workout with Polar Pulse heart rate monitor

Note: Starting with Day 1 do workout 1, but switch off workouts between 1 and 2 for each day following.

Workout 1
  1. 500 jump ropes without weighted vest
  2. 15 hammer curls on each with 65% of one rep max curl weight (I used 30lb dumbbells)
  3. 200 toe touches on a ball or elevated surface just about 8 inches off the ground
  4. 333 jump ropes with weighted vest or book bag filled with weight equivalent to
  5. 15 one dumbbell goblet squats at 65% pf estimated max weight (I used a 55lb. dumbbell)
  6. Repeat for 3 sets
Workout 2
  1. 333 jump ropes with weighted vest on
  2. 15 one dumbbell goblet squats at 65% of estimated max weight
  3. 15 hammer curls on each with 65% of one rep max curl weight
  4. 500 jump ropes without weighted vest
  5. 200 toe touches on a ball or elevated surface just about 8 inches off the ground
  6. Repeat for 3 sets
Aspects of SCM breath used for experimental trials

Note: This is not the exact Source Code Meditation, but it is very similar to it, with foundational aspects being incorporated into the routine from the SCM base routine itself.

  1. As you inhale, through you nose and out your nose, lightly press you tongue to the roof of your mouth with a light pressure along the entire surface area of the tongue. Hold your breath while you suction and swallow the extra saliva to the ensure that the air stays in the lung chambers
  2. As you are inhaling, also contract the muscle that you can feel when you need to stop yourself from peeing: which are your PC muscles.
  3. After you fully inhale, fully contract your core outward like Santa’s belly as you close your mouth and elevate your chest and open your arms in a supinated position, towards the space directly above you. (Overtime, this should seem fluid and effortless) Gently Center your eyes while their closed into your forehead.
  4. Exhale the breath through the nose and/or mouth while sucking in the stomach and lowering the chest, with hands in a non-supinated position.
  5. Inhale the breath into the lower part of the pelvic floor, while intensifying the connection with those pelvic muscles mentioned earlier.
  6. Exhale the same as step for, but elevate your chest back up.
  7. Repeat steps 1-6 for 33 breaths going from lower to upper areas, alternating.
  8. Hold the breath on the inhale for the 34th breath for 30 seconds with discipline. Be mindful that there will be specific areas in the body that seem to have discomfort. Observe them and focus on them.
  9. On the exhale of the last breath, you will want to release all holds and empty out the air fully. Every last bit of CO2 should be pushed out of the body, just as you would exhale through an imaginary straw. Your body will automatically start to create vacuums of consciousness, which will replicate that consciousness throughout your entire being. As you embrace the letting go of the toxic CO2, hold that moment for as long as possible.
  10. Repeat this 3 times and observe what happens to the live open heart data reading on the app.
    Note: Make sure to keep count because it is an essential part of the discipline and focus of the practice. Your subconscious heals with you, in massive action. ❣

Day 1: DATA collection- Open Heart Reading with meditation for baseline trial while utilizing SCM

  1. Record a trial of the baseline experimental which will be the first trial recorded utilizing aspects of the SCM breath base technique in a seated position for applicability in an athletic environment (e.g. taking a rest from athletic competition for a small break on the bench)
  2. Then, rest for the day.

Day 2: The Control Experiment

  1. Record a trial of the control experiment which will be the first trial recorded without utilizing aspects of the SCM breath base technique. However, remain in a seated position for applicability in an athletic environment
  2. Then, rest for the day.

Day 3: Trial for Comparison and Validity

  1. Record another trial for added validity and data to make accurate analysis. Utilize aspects of the SCM breath base technique in a seated position for applicability in an athletic environment (e.g. taking a rest from athletic competition for a small break on the bench)
  2. Then, rest for the day.

Day 4: Trial for Comparison and Validity

  1. Record another trial for added validity and data to make accurate analysis. Utilize aspects of the SCM breath base technique in a seated position for applicability in an athletic environment (e.g. taking a rest from athletic competition for a small break on the bench)
  2. Then, rest for the day.

Day 5: Trial for Comparison and Validity

  1. WAIT an hour after exercise has finished.
  2. Record another trial for added validity and data to make accurate analysis. Utilize aspects of the SCM breath base technique in a seated position in applicability in an athletic environment (e.g. taking a rest from athletic competition for a small break on the bench).
  3. Then, rest for the day.

Results:

Day 1: Data collection- Open Heart Reading with Meditation For Baseline

 

At the beginning of exercise, heart rate was an average of 80 bpm and HRV was at 62. At about a minute and a half into the breathing meditation practice, heart rate dropped down to around 75 from 160 beats per minute. At that point my HRV shot up to around 70 and stood there for half a minute. After that, HRV dropped down to around the 50s and stood in that range for around 2 more minutes. At around minute 3:30, heart rate fluctuated in three even intervals between 150 bpm- 65 bpm. This lasted for 30 seconds before leveling out at around 115 bpm. At around minute 11:30, I got heart rate up to a whopping 195 beats per minute before getting it down to around 75 bpm. At this interval, HRV rose up to around a 70 and stood there for 10 seconds. Overall, I got my heart rate down to sustainable levels at around 13 minutes, while HRV scores suggest that I was completely ready to perform.

 

 

Day 2: The Control Experiment

At the beginning of exercise, heart rate was an average of 83 bpm and HRV was at 52. Up until minute 5 my HRV score stood around a 30. At minute 5 it got up to a 42. Heart rate stood in the 110-150 beats per minute range up until minute 19, following the hour of intense exercise. After that heart rate dropped down to a safe 80-90 beats per minute range, but HRV stood below 30.

Day 3: Trial for Comparison and Validity

At the beginning of exercise, heart rate was an average of 71 bpm and HRV was at 64. At minute 1 following exercise, heart rate got up to around 155 then dropped down in a matter of seconds to around 88 bpm. At this moment HRV data shot up to a score of 63 and stood in that range for 30 seconds. At minute 3:30, my heart rate went from 168 down to a whopping 73 in a matter of 10 seconds. Then, as the heart rate began to fluctuate in at even intervals, I saw that it lowered itself extremely quickly between 115-99 beats per minute. HRV score reached a peak of 80 at minute 4. At around minute 4:20, heart rate shot down to 73 again before pushing my HRV into a range of 40-75. Heart rate then calmed down.

Day 4: Trial for Comparison and Validity

At the beginning of exercise, heart rate was an average of 68 bpm and HRV was at 61. At the one minute mark following the workout, my heart rate dipped down to about 93 after being in early and mid 100s leading up to minute 1. In addition, at the same point my HRV score shot up to above 60 from 30in an instant. That score held up for about 30 seconds, then dropped back down. My HRV reached around 78 at minute 3 after starting the SCM breathwork. As the intervals began to widen in magnitude, I saw a fluctuation in heart rate from ranges 115 bpm- 70 bpm for about a minute. During that interval in time, HRV scores fluctuated from ranges 55-70. In the last interval of time that I will refer to for this day, I saw the same fluctuation in heart rate around minute 5:45 (which was around 70 bpm-115 bpm ranges). Right after, my heart rate rose up to 135 bpm and gradually dropped down in equal magnitudes to a 90 bpm heart beat range in about 2 minutes. My HRV score stood between a range of 50-60.

Day 5: Trial for Comparison and Validity

At the end of exercise, heart rate was an average of 89 bpm and HRV was at 54. In this session, I didn’t perform the breath immediately after due to uncontrollable circumstances. However, I wanted to see how high I could get my HRV score after re-stabilizing  my heart rate. Between 4:30-5:00, my heart rate fluctuated between 100 bpm and 64 bpm in a perfectly coherent frequency. At that same time, my HRV rose up to a range of 65-75 for 30 seconds. Leading up to minute 4, My HRV dipped downward and my heart rate dipped downward into the 60s.

Conclusions

Utilizing Source Code Meditation to affect heart health has shown clear evidence to support my hypothesis that HRV would be generally higher. In addition, my heart rate lowered back down faster in those trials as well. Most of the time, when my heart rate fluctuated in equal intervals after peaking at a high level, my HRV score surged up by a considerable amount. In the results, you can clearly see higher HRV scores throughout the entire duration of the trials where I did utilize Source Code Meditation’s techniques. That means that with those trials, I was able to induce a physiological response that allowed me to be ready to perform. The final trial that I did showed me that without a high starting heart rate, I was able to elevate my HRV score extremely easily. This leads me to believe that practicing the techniques before exercise could help me to be more ready to perform during the workout.

Research on Variability in exposures and responses

Despite stress exposure being an inevitable part of life, not everyone develops stress-related illnesses at the same speed. One primary reason for this is that stress exposures are not distributed evenly across social groups. Women, young adults, members of racial-ethnic minority groups, divorced and widowed persons, and poor and working-class individuals report greater chronic stress and cumulative stress exposure across their lives (3). In addition, research has demonstrated that both psychological and physiological stress responses vary remarkably within and between people. Individual-level differences and environmental aspects interact to influence the psychological and physiological stress response outcome. These include socioeconomic and cultural factors, genetic and developmental factors, historical and current stressors, stable protective factors, and health behaviors(3). Life Codes and Shadow Energy are used in separate Summits of the 9 Summits of Transformation that work to fuel our higher brain activity to progress, express, and expand our Authentic Selves towards the Unitarian State. The Shadow Energy serves us as rocket fuel by loosening the grips to our lower brain. The exercise works by shifting focus to recognizing thoughts, feelings, and beliefs that arise. The Life Codes serves our expansion towards the Transcendent Self by choosing higher brain physiology. I would love to do another experiment recording brain wave activity and heart activity to prove the efficacy of using the Life Codes meditation to reach specific goals in the different dimensions.

If you’d like to learn more about Life Codes, check out my blog: Life Codes and Salutogenesis: The Most Revolutionary Meditational Practice of Source Code Meditation

We see this with training for muscular hypertrophy, muscular endurance and anaerobic fitness in particular, where there is a greater demand for the cardiovascular system to remove the accumulation of waste products (CO2 and lactate). During these types of training heart rates rise and peak at the end of each work period/set. The peaks will be larger for training oriented on muscular endurance and anaerobic fitness (longer work periods and less recovery time between each work period/set). As there is less recovery time between work periods/sets with muscular endurance and anaerobic fitness training, heart rates tend to rise incrementally throughout the workout as well as having peaks at the end of each set. Because of this it takes longer (20-40 minutes) for heart rate and stroke volume to return to normal resting levels at the end of the workout. This is due to a greater demand placed on the cardiovascular system to shunt greater quantities of blood out of working muscles, return blood to the vital organs and clear the accumulation of waste products (lactate & CO2)[3].

This prolonged elevation of heart rate post exercise is known as ‘EPOC’ (excessive post-exercise oxygen consumption).  Heart rates essentially stay elevated for longer after these types of training in order to metabolize the lactate that has accumulated and return the body to homeostasis. My hypothesis is that Source Code Meditation indirectly combats EPOC by working with the heart to contract and expand blood vessels throughout the body. From what I’ve been able to see from the data is that when utilizing the breathing techniques, I was able bring my heart rate down to lower levels while subsequently raising my Heart rate variability. This was accomplished 10 minutes faster in comparison to when measuring my heart health without utilizing the techniques, on a different day.

Keep in Mind

Empirical evidence supports a strong relationship between psychological stress and disease development. These studies may be underestimating the impact of stressor exposure and the stress response on health, given that measuring these constructs has been challenging and limited. Recent work in the stress field has identified important aspects of psychological stress to capture in order to fully test the role that psychological stress plays in predicting disease; these include capturing the specific type of stressor exposure, a wide range of psychological, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological responses to the exposure, and contextual and individual-level factors that moderate the impact of the exposure and response(2). The ultimate goal of having complex research on the relationship between stress, health, and well-being is to develop evidence-based ways to help people thrive in our stress-filled world.

In this experiment, stressful events(High Intensity Interval Training) caused stress responses that involve activation of physiologic systems. In the short term, mobilizing physiological salutogenesis to respond to a discrete event or threat is adaptive. In the long term, however, Source Code Meditation will help humanity to become infrangible.

The “wear and tear” hypothesis is theoretically compelling, but currently lacks definitive empirical support. This is because we do not currently have data that demonstrates how Source Code Meditation uses multiple physiological systems to help humans with evolving and transcending their own realities. Other potential pathways could include stress-related changes in endothelial function, elevated chronic inflammation, metabolic dysfunction, changes in DNA repair, changes in gene expression, and telomere shortening. These pathways are similar to chronic diseases beyond cardiovascular disease.

Associations between stress and immune system functioning are especially relevant given that the major diseases of aging in the United States that can be healed through the immune system(3). The top three leading causes of death in the United States—cardiovascular disease, cancer, and chronic lower respiratory disease—all share the common thread of being characterized by elevated chronic inflammation(3).

Chronic systemic inflammation has become a recent focus of health research. Stress exposure has been examined extensively as a predictor of increased systemic inflammation. Indeed, elevated systemic inflammation has been found in those experiencing chronic stress like caregivers, immediately after a stressful life event like death of a loved one, historical stress like childhood adversity, daily stress , and in response to lab-based stress tasks. A short-term response to stress is thought to be adaptive because it involves recruiting immune cells to the site of a real or potential injury in order to heal wounds resulting from stressor exposure. However, when there is no wound to heal, as is the case with psychosocial stressor exposure, repeated or exaggerated inflammatory responses may cause long-term damage and contribute to disease processes(2).

The Emotional Importance of Stress Related Subjective Research

Other non-acute stress states, such as feeling excited, focusing attention on non-negative affect inducing stimuli, or exercising, also trigger biological responses that are similar to those evoked by negative affect inducing acute stressors like increased heart rate and blood pressure. This is even true for what is often termed the “stress hormone,” cortisol—not all cortisol increases are triggered by increases in psychological stress responses, nor does every experience that people perceive as “stressful” cause cortisol to rise (Dickerson and Kemeny, 2004). Therefore, biomarkers should not replace self-report, behavioral, and cognitive outcomes as primary outcomes in psychosocial intervention trials aimed at reducing stress or related goals. In a new experiment, I could focus on collecting qualitative data regarding the wellbeing that the meditation brings because some people value how they feel more than any biomarkers that I can measure. Overall, the experiment was a success.

References-

  1.  Antonovsky A . Health, stress and coping. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1979.Google Scholar
  2.  Antonovsky A . Unraveling the mystery of health. How people manage stress and stay well. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1987.
  3. 1. Health Psychol Open. 2020 Jul-Dec; 7(2): 2055102920933072. Published online 2020 Jul 8. doi: 10.1177/2055102920933072 PMCID: PMC7359652. PMID: 32704379. Alexandra D Crosswell and Kimberly G Lockwood. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, USA. Alexandra D Crosswell, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, 3333 California Street, Suite 465, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA. Email: ude.fscu@llewssorC.ardnaxelA Copyright © The Author(s) 2020

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